Canon UK supports local environment with the big butterfly count

United Kingdom, Republic of Ireland, 21 July 2016 – Canon UK, a leader in imaging solutions, took part in the big butterfly count on 20 July, organised by the Butterfly Conservation.

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Employees at Canon UK’s headquarters in Reigate, participated in the count to help protect the local habitat, enhance biodiversity and raise awareness of the effect climate change is having on wildlife in the local area.

Surrie Everett-Pascoe, Canon UK’s Sustainability and Management Systems Manager, said, “We are thrilled to be supporting the Butterfly Conservation with the big butterfly count this year. Our company ethos, Kyosei, means living and working together for the common good and we feel that the count is an important way to help support our natural habitats, and in turn, protect our society. We spotted over seven species, counting over 60 butterflies in total. We hope that by submitting our results, experts can work out trends in species and help conservationists protect butterflies from extinction, as well as predict variations in climate change.”

The big butterfly count initiative, which runs from 15 July – 7 August, is another example of how Canon UK has a continued focus on sustainability and protecting the surrounding environment. Canon’s office buildings in Reigate are BREEAM accredited and set in 23 acres of meadow and woodland, purposely built to blend into the natural landscape surrounding the buildings.

The big butterfly count is a nationwide survey aimed at helping assess the health of the environment in the UK. It was launched in 2010 and has rapidly become the world's biggest survey of butterflies.

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